Vitamin D Deficiency In Kidney Transplant Recipients

Vitamin D Deficiency In Kidney Transplant Recipients

If you have a Kidney Transplant this video is for you! First things first, let’s get into some very important insight. A huge amount of the American population is lacking in an essential vitamin, vitamin D. Upwards of one-half of Americans of all ages have low levels of vitamin D. A lot of research and studies show how important vitamin D is to the body, especially the strength of bones. In addition to maintaining healthy bones, newer research determines that vitamin D may also protect against heart disease. In fact, people with the lowest vitamin D levels had a 40% higher risk of cardiovascular disease in one study.

The kidneys play an important role in helping the body utilize vitamin D. Vitamin D comes from two sources in people. It could either be exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet B radiation or it’s absorbed from food or food supplements. However, with chronic kidney disease, low vitamin D levels can be found, at times even critically low levels.  As much as 80% of patients with chronic kidney disease may be deficient in Vitamin D. This may occur because injured kidneys are less able to convert vitamin D into its active form. These individuals should supplement with vitamin D3

Now, due to factors like the medication you take as a transplant recipient, there’s a high probability that you could eventually suffer from bone loss, putting yourself at risk of developing conditions like Osteoporosis or Osteopenia. So what can you do about it? First things first, have your Vitamin D levels checked, your are more than likely low in Vitamin D, but you want to be 100% sure. Now, you might already know you are low but it is extremely important to know your exact Vitamin D level so you can optimize how much you should supplement yourself with. You want to aim to get your Vitamin D level to the optimal range which is 50-70 ng/ml. Take anywhere between 1,500 – 4,000/5,000 IU’s per day to get to that optimal range.

Study referenced: – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34747516/